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Toronto police looking for suspect in $1M diamond fraud investigation

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Police are asking for the public?s help in finding a suspect after a man was allegedly defrauded of $1 million worth of diamonds.

According to Toronto police, a 61-year-old man invested and collected several loose, coloured diamonds. He made arrangements to sell the diamonds to the suspect, who said he was a doctor, Wednesday evening.

The two men met at a restaurant in the Keele Street and Wilson Avenue area. The suspect gave a cheque to the man for the diamonds, but the cheque was later determined to be fake.

The man went to police on Thursday to report what happened.

Police described the suspect as being 45 to 50 years old, standing around 5?10? and having short, dark hair. He was last seen wearing a beige shirt, dark dress pants and possibly an olive-coloured Kippah.

Anyone with information is being asked to call police at 416-808-3100 or Crime Stoppers anonymously at 416-222-8477.

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